HCP

Samela et al. (2016)
Transition to a Tube Feeding Formula With Real Food Ingredients in Pediatric Patients With Intestinal Failure. Nutrition in Clinical Practice. Nutrition in Clinical Practice. Volume 32 Number 2 April 2017 277– 281

Aim: To test the tolerance of a tube feeding formula with real food ingredients in pediatric patients with intestinal failure.

Design: Retrospective analysis of patient journals and the symptoms. Patients received continuous enteral nutrition or a combination of continuous and bolus feedings of Compleat® Paediatric.

10 children ( > 1y, Average age: 28.1 months) with congenital or acquired severe gastrointestinal disease on PN > 60 days

Outcome measures: Stool consistency and volume (number of stools in 24-hour period). Abdominal distention, gas production, vomiting and overall comfort level.

Results:

  • 9/10 children tolerated the transition to tube feeding with derived from food ingredients
  • Reduced diarrhoea and constipation
  • Improvements in stool frequency
  • All children stopped the use of supplemental fibre and stool softeners.

Conclusion:

Tube feeding with ingredients from real food (Compleat® Pediatric) resulted in significant improvements in tolerance to tube feedings after PN support and improved stooling patterns.

 

Pentiuk et al. (2011)
Pureed by Gastrostomy Tube Diet Improves Gagging and Retching in Children With Fundoplication. JPEN, 2011; 35(3): 375-379

Aim: To test whether a pureed by gastrostomy tube diet can improve tolerance, gagging and retching symptoms in response to tube feeding after Nissen fundoplication.

Design: Retrospective review of patient journals and the symptoms
N=33 children (average age 34.2 months) who had undergone Nissen fundoplication surgery in addition to G-tube placement. 88% of children had a developmental delay
Patients who received commercially prepared baby food or formulas the base of the diet.

Outcome measures: Individualised feeding plan and fluid goals assessed after at least 2 months. Intake of multivitamin, calcium or electrolytes. Body weight development.
Gagging and retching.

Results:

  • 52% of children reported 76-100% reduction in gagging and retching
  • 73% had ≥ 50% reduction in symptoms
  • 57% had an increase in oral food intake (decrease in oral aversion)
  • None of the children had worsening of symptoms and all children gained appropriate amount of weight
  • Anecdotal reports of reduced constipation on pureed by gastrostomy tube diet

Conclusion:

  • Blenderised tube feed formulas reduce symptoms of gagging and retching seen in children post-fundoplication surgery.
  • Pureed by gastrostomy tube diets can reduce aversion to food often seen in this patient population.