Feeding and CMPA

Feeding a Cows' Milk Allergy Baby

Feeding your baby and managing CMA

Symptoms of cows' milk allergy (CMA) can be distressing. The good news is that CMA can be easily managed by adjusting your baby’s diet to remove cow’s milk proteins. Once managed correctly, you are likely to quickly notice improvements to symptoms in 2 to 4 weeks.

It is important that you do not experiment with a cow’s milk-free diet for your baby without recommendation and guidance from your doctor or healthcare professional.

Breastfeeding is the best feeding option for you and your baby. Even if your baby has been diagnosed with CMA, you should continue breastfeeding. Based on the severity of your baby’s symptoms, and whether your baby might also be allergic to any other foods, your doctor will help you to choose the most appropriate feeding option to manage your baby’s CMA.




Continue to breastfeed your baby with CMA

Diagnosis of CMA should not affect your breastfeeding routine. In fact, breastfeeding is the best feeding option for you and your baby.

Breast milk contains all of the nutrients your baby needs in the first 6 months and continues to be beneficial for much longer. In addition to nutrients, your breast milk also passes the protection of your immune system to your baby. In rare cases, when your baby’s immune system reacts to cows’ milk proteins in breast milk, your doctor might recommend you to start an elimination diet totally free from cows’ milk protein.

Breastfeeding is the best feeding option for you and your baby. Even if your baby has been diagnosed with CMA, you should continue breastfeeding. Based on the severity of your baby’s symptoms, and whether your baby might also be allergic to any other foods, your doctor will help you to choose the most appropriate feeding option to manage your baby’s CMA.

Importance and benefits of breast feeding

What type of nutrition is best for my baby?

The only way to improve your baby’s symptoms is to remove cows’ milk proteins from your baby’s diet.

It is important that you do not experiment with a cows’ milk-free diet for your baby without recommendation and guidance from your doctor.

 

When exclusive breastfeeding is not feasible, or when it is supplemented with formula, your doctor will help you choose the suitable formula that is free from cows’ milk proteins. These formulas have been designed with your baby in mind and contain the necessary nutrients to support growth and development.

 

These specialized formulas can be based on cows’ milk that have been treated in a certain way to ensure that proteins, whey for example, are no longer recognized by your baby’s immune system and so do not cause an allergic reaction or Amino acids that are the individual building blocks that make up proteins.

 

The table below describes the differences between the different types of formulas.

 

eHF

AAF

What is it?

eHF stands for “extensively hydrolysed formula.” The proteins in cow’s milk that cause your baby’s allergic reactions have been extensively broken down (hydrolyzed).

AAF stands for “amino acid formula.” This formula does not contain any cows’ milk protein. It instead contains amino acids that are usually derived from vegetarian sources.

What does it consist of?

Cows’ milk proteins have been broken down to smaller parts, which means that they can no longer be recognised by your baby’s immune system.

 

These formulas also contain other nutrients to support your baby’s growth and development.


WHEN AND HOW TO START WITH THE INTRODUCTION OF SOLID FOODS

By the time your baby is 6 months old, breastfeeding (or infant formulas) is no longer sufficient to fully support growth and development, and complementary foods should be introduced. The exact timing will depend on the individual infant and family.

Weaning before 17 weeks is not recommended. If you start complementary feeding too early, you can increase the risk of your baby becoming ill—the reflex that supports moving of solid foods around the mouth and swallowing them usually develops between ages of 4 and 7 months.

Similarly, if you start too late, your baby may not be getting all the nutritional support they need, which increases the risk of your baby developing deficiencies in key vitamins and minerals and delayed growth.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: Breastfeeding is the best form of nutrition for babies and provides many benefits to babies and mothers. It is important that, in preparation for and during breastfeeding, you eat a healthy, balanced diet. Combined breast and bottle feeding in the first weeks of life may reduce the supply of your own breastmilk, and reversing the decision not to breastfeed is difficult. Always consult your healthcare professional for advice about feeding your baby. The social and financial implications of using infant formula should be considered. Improper use of an infant formula or inappropriate foods or feeding methods may present a health hazard. If you use infant formula, you should follow the manufacturer’s instructions for use carefully – failure to follow the instructions may make your baby ill. Formula for special medical purposes intended for infants must be used under medical supervision.